Geschichte von American Saw

American Graffiti [Blu-ray]
Universal Pictures Germany GmbH
EUR 5,55
I Saw Poland Betrayed: An American Ambassador Reports To The American People (English Edition)
Lucknow Books
Arthur Bliss Lane was a hugely experienced American Diplomat, having worked all over the world before his posting to the Polish Government in 1944. The Polish Government was then in exile in London and he gained a great deal of respect for the Polish leadership. He followed them back to their homeland in 1945 as the Poles sought to set-up a democratic state from the smashed debris of years of Nazi domination. What transpired was a new form of despotism in Soviets, in this memoir Bliss gives a detailed history of Poland from 1944-1947, the post-war border changes and the Soviet creation of a puppet state in Poland after WWII. In Bliss’ view the Poles were hung out to dry by the Allies after 1945 and his memoir provides compelling evidence of this.
When Dimple Met Rishi: The laugh-out-loud YA romcom (English Edition)
Hodder & Stoughton
The arranged marriage YA romcom you didn't know you wanted or needed... 'Get ready to fall in love with Dimple Shah and Rishi Patel' HelloGigglesDimple Shah has it all figured out. With graduation behind her, she's more than ready for a break from her family, from Mamma's inexplicable obsession with her finding the 'Ideal Indian Husband.' Ugh. Dimple knows they must respect her principles on some level, though. If they truly believed she needed a husband right now, they wouldn't have paid for her to attend a summer program for aspiring web developers...right?Rishi Patel is a hopeless romantic. So when his parents tell him that his future wife will be attending the same summer program as him - wherein he'll have to woo her - he's totally on board. Because as silly as it sounds to most people in his life, Rishi wants to be arranged, because he believes in the power of tradition, stability, and being a part of something much bigger than himself.The Shahs and Patels didn't mean to start turning the wheels on this 'suggested arrangement' so early in their children's lives, but when they noticed them both gravitate toward the same summer program, they figured, Why not?Dimple and Rishi may think they have each other figured out. But when opposites clash, love works hard to prove itself in the most unexpected ways . . .'Menon wrote an utterly delightful novel and broke my heart by writing an ending because I want nothing more than to keep reading about Dimple and Rishi forever . . .' Book Riot'Funny, warm, and utterly charming' Katherine Webber
The Fault in Our Stars
Penguin
EUR 5,00
The Fault in Our Stars
A. H. Shipman Bracket Saw Company: 1881 Catalog
Astragal Press
EUR 5,03
The Amateur Mechanic s Manual and Catalogue of Scroll Saws and Lathes is the actual title of this enlightening little catalog. Not only is this catalog filled with detailed information about the Shipman Products, but it is loaded with instructions, tips, and how-to-dos that every wood turner, carver and woodworker will find useful. Includes tips for Fret sawing in metals, shell, pearl and ivory to the original sales detail on the Prize Holly Scroll Saw. Reprinted in 2002 in conjunction with the Annual Meeting of the Early American Industries Association.
The Last Fighter Pilot: The True Story of the Final Combat Mission of World War II (English Edition)
Regnery History
*A NATIONAL BESTSELLER!*The New York Post calls The Last Fighter Pilot a "must-read" book.From April to August of 1945, Captain Jerry Yellin and a small group of fellow fighter pilots flew dangerous bombing and strafe missions out of Iwo Jima over Japan. Even days after America dropped the atomic bombs on Hiroshima on August 6 and Nagasaki on August 9, the pilots continued to fly. Though Japan had suffered unimaginable devastation, the emperor still refused to surrender. Bestselling author Don Brown (Treason) sits down with Yelllin, now ninety-three years old, to tell the incredible true story of the final combat mission of World War II. Nine days after Hiroshima, on the morning of August 14th, Yellin and his wingman 1st Lieutenant Phillip Schlamberg took off from Iwo Jima to bomb Tokyo. By the time Yellin returned to Iwo Jima, the war was officially over—but his young friend Schlamberg would never get to hear the news. The Last Fighter Pilot is a harrowing first-person account of war from one of America's last living World War II veterans.
But Not Jim Crow: Family Memories of African American Loggers of Maxville, Oregon (English Edition)
African American Loggers Memory Project
This book is about African American loggers who came to Oregon during the Great Migration of more than six million African Americans from the Jim Crow south to the north.  They began arriving in Maxville, a railroad-logging town in Wallowa County owned by the Bowman Hicks Lumber Company.  They first arrived in 1923 and continued to come until the mid-1940s.  Chapters one and two document the migration from historical newspapers, public records, local photo archives, and oral history sources.  The third chapter introduces the six extended families and their southern roots.  The fourth chapter contains the fifteen descendants’memories – beginning with the memoir of one of the logger followed by the memories of fifteen descendants of the six families.
The Things Our Fathers Saw—The Untold Stories of the World War II Generation From Hometown, USA-Volume I: Voices of the Pacific Theater (English Edition)

The telephone rings on the hospital floor, and they tell you it is your mother, the phone call you have been dreading. You’ve lost part of your face to a Japanese sniper on Okinawa, and after many surgeries, the doctor has finally told you that at 19, you will never see again. The pain and shock is one thing. But now you have to tell her, from 5000 miles away. — ‘So I had a hard two months, I guess. I kept mostly to myself. I wouldn't talk to people. I tried to figure out what the hell I was going to do when I got home. How was I going to tell my mother this? You know what I mean?’ ~Jimmy Butterfield, WWII Marine veteran ~From the author of 'The Things Our Fathers Saw' World War II eyewitness history series~ How soon we forget. Or perhaps, we were never told. That is understandable, given what they saw. — ‘I was talking to a shipmate of mine waiting for the motor launch, and all at once I saw a plane go over our ship. I did not know what it was, but the fellow with me said, 'That's a Jap plane, Jesus!' It went down and dropped a torpedo. Then I saw the Utah turn over.’ ~Barney Ross, U.S. Navy seaman, Pearl HarborAt the height of World War II, LOOK Magazine profiled a small American community for a series of articles portraying it as the wholesome, patriotic model of life on the home front. Decades later, author Matthew Rozell tracks down over thirty survivors who fought the war in the Pacific, from Pearl Harbor to the surrender at Tokyo Bay. — ‘Rage is instantaneous. He's looking at me from a crawling position. I didn't shoot him; I went and kicked him in the head. Rage does funny things. After I kicked him, I shot and killed him.’ ~Thomas Jones, Marine veteran, Battle of GuadalcanalThese are the stories that the magazine could not tell to the American public. — ‘I remember it rained like hell that night, and the water was running down the slope into our foxholes. I had to use my helmet to keep bailing out, you know. Lt. Gower called us together. He said, 'I think we're getting hit with a banzai. We're going to have to pull back. 'Holy God, there was howling and screaming! They had naked women, with spears, stark naked!’ ~Nick Grinaldo, U.S. Army veteran, SaipanBy the end of 2018, fewer than 400,000 WW II veterans will still be with us, out of the over 16 million who put on a uniform. But why is it that today, nobody seems to know these stories? Maybe our veterans did not volunteer; maybe we were too busy with our own lives to ask. But they opened up to the younger generation, when a history teacher told their grandchildren to ask. — ‘I hope you'll never have to tell a story like this, when you get to be 87. I hope you'll never have to do it.' ~Ralph Leinoff, Marine veteran Iwo Jima, to his teenage interviewer This book brings you the previously untold firsthand accounts of combat and brotherhood, of captivity and redemption, and the aftermath of a war that left no American community unscathed. — ‘After 3½ years of starvation and brutal treatment, that beautiful symbol of freedom once more flies over our head! Our POW camp tailor worked all night and finished our first American flag! The blue came from a GI barracks bag, red from a Jap comforter and the white from an Australian bed sheet. When I came out of the barracks and saw those beautiful colors for the first time, I felt like crying!’~Joe Minder, U.S. Army POW, Japan,1945As we forge ahead as a nation, we owe it to ourselves to become reacquainted with a generation that is fast leaving us, who asked for nothing but gave everything, to attune ourselves as Americans to a broader appreciation of what we stand for.
The Things Our Fathers Saw—The Untold Stories of the World War II Generation-Volume II: War in the Air—From the Great Depression to Combat (English Edition)

"For all of us to be free, a few of us must be brave, and that is the history of America." But dying for freedom isn’t the worst that could happen. Being forgotten is. — “You flew with what I would call ‘controlled fear’. You were scared stiff, but it was controlled. My ball turret gunner—he couldn’t take it anymore… I guess he was right. He’s dead now. But he had lost control of the fear. He never got out of that ball turret; he died in that ball turret.” —B-24 bombardier ~THE LONG-AWAITED SEQUEL IN THE BEST SELLING ‘The Things Our Fathers Saw’ SERIES~How soon we forget. Or perhaps, we were never told. That is understandable, given what they saw. — “I spent a lot of time in hospitals. I had a lot of trouble reconciling how my mother died [of a cerebral hemorrhage] from the telegram she opened, saying I was [shot down and] “missing in action”. I didn’t explain to her the fact that ‘missing in action’ is not necessarily ‘killed in action’. You know? I didn’t even think about that. How do you think you feel when you find out you killed your mother?” —B-24 bombardier At the height of World War II, LOOK Magazine profiled a small upstate New York community for a series of articles portraying it as the wholesome, patriotic model of life on the home front. Seventy years later, a history teacher tracks down the veterans with a connection to “Hometown, USA” who fought the war in the air over Europe, men who were tempered in the tough times of the Great Depression and forged in battle. He rescues and resurrects firsthand accounts of combat and brotherhood, of captivity and redemption, and the aftermath of a war that left no American community unscathed. Here are the stories that the magazine could not tell, from a vanishing generation speaking to America today. — “I was in the hospital with a flak wound. The next mission, the entire crew was killed. The thing that haunts me is that I can’t put a face to the guy who was a replacement. He was an 18-year old Jewish kid named Henry Vogelstein from Brooklyn. It was his first and last mission. He made his only mission with a crew of strangers.” —B-24 navigator By the end of 2018, fewer than 400,000 WW II veterans will still be with us, out of the over 16 million who put on a uniform. But why is it that today, nobody seems to know these stories? Maybe our veterans did not volunteer to tell us; maybe we were too busy with our own lives to ask. But they opened up to the younger generation, when a history teacher told their grandchildren to ask. — “The German fighters picked us. I told the guys, ‘Keep your eyes open, we are about to be hit!’ I saw about six or eight feet go off my left wing. I rang the ‘bail-out’ signal, and I reached out and grabbed the co-pilot out of his seat. I felt the airplane climbing, and I thought to myself, ‘If this thing stalls out, and starts falling down backwards, no one is going to get out...’” —B-17 pilot This book brings you the previously untold firsthand accounts of combat and brotherhood, of captivity and redemption, and the aftermath of a war that left no American community unscathed.As we forge ahead as a nation, we owe it to ourselves to become reacquainted with a generation that is fast leaving us, who asked for nothing but gave everything, to attune ourselves as Americans to a broader appreciation of what we stand for. — “A must-read in every high school in America. It is a very poignant look back at our greatest generation; maybe it will inspire the next one.” Reviewer, Vol. I
At Gettysburg, Or, What A Girl Saw And Heard Of The Battle. A True Narrative. [Illustrated Edition] (English Edition)
Golden Springs Publishing
Includes Gettysburg Map and Illustrations Pack – 30 additional maps, plans and illustrations“The experience of a little girl, during three days of a hard fought battle, as portrayed in this volume is certainly of rare occurrence, and very likely has never been realized before.Such a narrative as the following, is worthy of preservation among the pages of our nations literature.The story is told with such marked faithfulness, such honesty of expression, such vividness of portrayal, that those who lived in, and passed through those scenes, or similar ones, will at once recognize the situations, and surroundings, as natural and real.While perusing its pages, the veteran will again live in the days gone by; when he tramped the dusty march, joined in the terrible charge, or suffered in the army hospital.The Heroine of this book, performed her part well; but it is doubtful whether, at the time, she fully realized the heart-felt thanks, and noble thoughts that sprang from the "Boys in Blue," in response to her heroism and kindness.How vividly is presented the weary march to the field of conflict; our eagerness to quaff the sparkling water, as she handed it to us, fresh from the cooling spring.We thanked her, but she did not hear the full gratitude that was in our hearts.”-Preface.
What I saw in California; being the journal of a tour, by E. Bryant ... [Abridged.] To which is added, California as it is, and as it may be; a guide ... By Dr. Wierzbicki ... With a map, etc.
British Library, Historical Print Editions
EUR 20,02
What I saw in California; being the journal of a tour, by E. Bryant ... [Abridged.] To which is added, California as it is, and as it may be; a guide to the gold regions. By Dr. Wierzbicki ... With a map, etc. British Library, Historical Print EditionsThe British Library is the national library of the United Kingdom. It is one of the world's largest research libraries holding over 150 million items in all known languages and formats: books, journals, newspapers, sound recordings, patents, maps, stamps, prints and much more. Its collections include around 14 million books, along with substantial additional collections of manuscripts and historical items dating back as far as 300 BC.The HISTORY OF COLONIAL NORTH AMERICA collection includes books from the British Library digitised by Microsoft. This collection refers to the European settlements in North America through independence, with emphasis on the history of the thirteen colonies of Britain. Attention is paid to the histories of Jamestown and the early colonial interactions with Native Americans. The contextual framework of this collection highlights 16th century English, Scottish, French, Spanish, and Dutch expansion.
WHAT A BOY SAW IN THE ARMY: A Story of Sight-Seeing and Adventure in the War for the Union (English Edition)

What a Boy Saw in the ArmyFROM THOSE WHOSE OPINIONS CARRY WEIGHT.SEE WHAT THEY SAY OK IT:The book is very interesting as a story, with its vivid pictures and incidents of military life during our great war. I like the book, and feel sure that boys will not only enjoy it, but will receive instruction from the many true insights it gives of the every day life of the young men in the ranks during the war. My son, Harry, a young man, liked the work, and was enthusiastic in reading it.Major General United States Army, Governor’s Island, N. Y.The Christian Advocate, New York.Dr. Young is the Editor of the Central Christian Advocate, published in St. Louis. He entered the army , and was barely out of his teens when the struggle ended in 1865. For years he has lectured with great popularity upon his scenes, experiences, and surroundings in the war. He tells us about the boy’s early life, and where he was when he heard the blast of the bugle and beat of the drum, and thrillingly describes the circumstances which led him to write to his mother asking permission to enlist; speaks of her refusal at first and the final consent; gives with interesting detail an account of his enlisting, the first review, the great men he saw, his enthusiasm, and then the experiences of a brief campaign which took all the shine off. Some persons think that accounts of battles are not suitable for boys. We think that accounts of patriotic struggles make patriots. It is a stirring narrative, and will please every boy that has it, and can do none any harm. It is really more fascinating than the sensational tales which lead so many astray; and it is all true, and a part of the history of our country.The Inter Ocean, Chicago.This is a story of high adventure and sight seeing by a boy who was in the war for the Union in the stormy days of ’61 to ’65. There was scarcely a brigade in the old Union army that did not have its “ Boy of the Regiment.” The spirit of patriotism did not stop with the fathers in 1861, but was seen in the boys, and in numerous instances they smuggled themselves into the commands and stayed there. The writer of this knew many such, who were too young and too small and weak at first to carry a gun, who, before the war closed had made a record as good soldiers second to none. The story here told is of a boy barely out of his teens, who went through the war, and here presents pictures that will warm every patriotic man and woman that reads. Mr. Frank Beard, the artist, has caught the very spirit of the camp fire and the march and the battle, and aptly emphasizes the interesting text. It is one of those books that must be read to be appreciated. Army scenes and sketches cannot be listed up in a review and do them any justice. Let the boys and girls read. They are in no danger of being too patriotic. The man or woman that does not love his country is a poor lover indeed. The book is in handsome ornamented covers and large clear print.I have read What a Boy Saw in the Army and am iree to say it surpasses any book of the kind I ever read. Its portrayal of scenes and events is graphic. Jack Sanderson is truly a hero; Sergeant McBride an insuppressible wit. No person reading it can fail to have his love for God and native land immeasurably increased. It ought to have a large sale. It will be a positive pleasure for me to place it in the hands of my people, and as I have opportunity will endeavor to secure subscriptions for it. Pardon this uncalled for endorsement of What a Boy Saw in the Army. I cannot suppress it.
Who Invented the American Steamboat?: A Statement of the Evidence that the First American Steamboat, Propelled by Means of Paddle Wheels, was Invented, ... Robert Fulton Saw the... (English Edition)
HardPress
This is a reproduction of a classic text optimised for kindle devices. We have endeavoured to create this version as close to the original artefact as possible. Although occasionally there may be certain imperfections with these old texts, we believe they deserve to be made available for future generations to enjoy.